Beste Trilogien

Beste Trilogien Angebote zum Thema

Star Wars: Episode I - Die dunkle Bedrohung (). Star Wars: Episode II - Angriff der Klonkrieger (). Star Wars: Episode III - Die Rache der Sith (). Wir haben die besten Film-Trilogien aller Zeiten bewertet – das ist das Ergebnis: ✓ Ausführliche Topliste ✓ 21 Trilogien ✓ Spoilerfrei. Wer hat. Die Besten Film-Trilogien - Die besten Filmtrilogien die ich gesehen habe. Wird daher eine bunte Liste. Vorschläge werden auch aufgenommen, vorrausgesetzt,​.

Beste Trilogien

Aller guten Dinge sind drei! Das ist das Motto für unsere Liste der besten Trilogien aller Zeiten. Wer weder nach nur einem Buch schon Abschied nehmen.​. Wir haben die besten Film-Trilogien aller Zeiten bewertet – das ist das Ergebnis: ✓ Ausführliche Topliste ✓ 21 Trilogien ✓ Spoilerfrei. Wer hat. Wir machen es Ihnen einfach und stellen Ihnen die besten Film-Trilogien aller Zeiten vor, damit Sie Ihren kostbaren freien Abend nicht mit der.

Statt dass die Sequels die Geschichte des Originals einfach aufwärmten, wurde weitergedacht und weitererzählt. Jeder Teil bietet verschiedene Settings das Finale ist ein Western!

Zumindest in der Theorie ist dieses Film-Terzett jedoch ein beinahe perfektes Franchise. Kritik: Jason Bourne Topliste: 15 unterschätzte Filme des Jahrhunderts von Film Plus Kritik.

Das Piratenfilm-Genre galt als ausgestorben. Die simple Mixtur aus Action, Fantasy und Komödie war die Wiederentdeckung des Abenteuerfilms, der seit der 90er ein langes Tief ertragen musste.

Sie seien zu ambitioniert, zu verworren und zu überladen. Doch rückblickend sind die beiden Fortsetzungen besser als ihr Ruf: Das fantasievolle Worldbuilding, der starke Cast und die visuelle Ästhetik können von nur wenigen modernen Blockbustern getoppt werden.

Kritik: Pirates of the Caribbean: Salazars Rache. Topliste: Die besten Filme von Christopher Nolan. Hier fehlt allerdings eine der wichtigsten und besten Filmtrilogien überhaupt.

Die Amerika-Trilogie von Leone. Zudem mag ich auch die Vengeance Trilogie von Park Chan-wook. Topliste: Die besten Film-Trilogien aller Zeiten. Lesedauer: 15 Mins.

Oktober Uhr Keyvan Azh. Die Bewertungskriterien: Die Filme müssen als Trilogie geplant oder anerkannt gewesen sein. Wie konsistent ist die Qualität der einzelnen Filme in der Trilogie?

Wie interessant und innovativ ist das Konzept der Trilogie? Welchen Einfluss hat die Trilogie? Die Liste ist bis zu einem gewissen Grad natürlich subjektiv!

Now, let's grab a bite to eat. Revenge is a dish best served cold, say the Klingons, but the Koreans might disagree. Park Chan-Wook's first film in this loose trilogy suggests that vengeance is a dish best not served at all, since it can lead to the death of everyone who gets involved in it.

The second sees a rather more elaborate - and much longer-term - plan of revenge similarly backfire, with arguably even ickier consequences than the first.

And the third, while boasting a sort-of happy ending, sees an uncomfortable amount of blood spilled along the way and makes it clear that this vengeance lark isn't easy.

Any way you look at it, however, these cleverly plotted and twisty-turny thrillers are a worthy addition here, proving that Korean cinema's turning up some of the most interesting films in the world right now - and that it features a lot more octopus eating than the Europeans typically employ.

Probably Lady Vengeance, which lacks the intricate plotting of the other two and spends more time focusing on red eyeshadow. Fun fact: Four octopuses were used to get Oldboy's famous eight-armed scene.

Actor Chi Min-Sik is a Buddhist, and said a prayer for each one. The slasher film was pretty much dead and buried in But Wes Craven, who'd spun a post-modern but relatively little-seen twist on it for New Nightmare two years before, managed to single-handedly bring it back to life with this witty deconstruction of the whole genre.

So this time our unstoppable killer who always comes back for one last scare just when you think he - or she - is dead faces victims who know how to survive a horror movie, who don't always run upstairs and who frequently fight back.

The first sequel riffed on the cliches of Part IIs, while the less-successful but still original third instalment got really meta, visiting a sequel movie within the movie.

Oooh, our heads are spinning! Scream 3, which isn't as effective as satire and perhaps stretches the willingness to suspend disbelief just a little far.

Fun fact: Much more blood was used in Scream 50 gallons than Scream 2 30 gallons or Scream 3 a measly By that measure, the upcoming Scream 4 should be blood-free.

Blade and X-Men had hinted that these superhero movies might be going places, but it was Spider-Man that actually went there.

But its huge box-office success was thoroughly earned, director Sam Raimi placing Peter Parker's character front and centre and casting indie star Tobey Maguire rather than some he-man , with Spider-antics taking a secondary - but nonetheless effective place.

The sequel, pitting Spidey against Alfred Molina's brilliant Doc Ock, was a further step up, and if the third one tried to cram in too much, at least it gave us Thomas Haden Church's bittersweet take on the Sandman.

Why on Earth anyone thinks this series needs a reboot we'll never know, but these three are first among superheroes for a reason.

Spider-Man 3, where a tussle over bad guys between director and studio led to a film overloaded with evildoers and short on focus.

Fun fact: In the first film, Norman Osbourne's presentation to the board opens with the same dialogue as a similar board meeting in The Hudsucker Proxy, which Raimi was a co-writer on.

While each of them has come in for schtick from the fans we're looking at you, Spaced , the fact that the Star Wars prequels made this list, and placed this high, suggests that there are those of you out there who love them despite their flaws.

After all, each has at least one stand-out action sequence; each gave us full-on Jedis battling bad guys after twenty years of waiting, and each gave us the chance to revisit the Star Wars universe, which was a treat in itself.

So let's ignore Jar-Jar, and focus on the Duel of the Fates, and the sight of Yoda drawing his lightsaber with the power of the Force, and Obi-Wan standing on the higher ground.

If you just look at those bits, these are just as good as the originals. The Phantom Menace has the biggest helping of Jar-Jar, but also has that ace lightsaber fight at the end.

Attack of the Clones is the most often derided, but has a bit where Yoda gets his 'saber out, and that has to get it bonus points. But while Phantom was the biggest disappointment relative to expectations, Clones still probably edges it overall.

Fun fact: If you look closely during the opening sequence when the second Separatist ship is destroyed, you might spot the kitchen sink that ILM threw into their digital footage.

You weren't there at the beginning! You don't know how good it was! Jackson, Jeremy Irons. One man. One building. A handful of terrorists.

There's no way Die Hard should be this good. And yet it's a nearly perfect action movie, combining one of history's best underdog heroes with a blast of great action and one of the all-time snarkiest villains.

The second one ups the stakes, giving us a crowded airport - and the skies above it - packed with hostages and ready for disaster.

And the third steps it up again, to an entire city, but adds in the least annoying sidekick in history well he is Samuel L. Jackson and plays a nice twist for good measure.

Just think: before this movie Bruce Willis was best known as the romantic lead in Moonlighting. What a difference a white vest and no shoes makes, eh?

It's generally considered to be the second film, set at Washington's Dulles airport just before Christmas and featuring a slightly weaker villain than the trilogy's book-ends.

This is all, of course, assuming you don't count Die Hard 4. When we talked to Pirates screenwriter Terry Rossio last year, he was rather irate that the philosophy and plot twists of the Disney series haven't garnered the sort of academic attention that, say, The Matrix did.

And it's certainly true that these intricately structured adventures resemble operatic farces as much as they do traditional summer blockbusters.

But in the end, the main reason we love them is because of someone originally conceived as a supporting character, the barmy, brilliant Captain Jack Sparrow.

At World's End, which twists and turns and meanders far too often on its way to the conclusion, with every character betraying every other on their path.

Fun fact: While the series is based on one Disneyland ride, there's a reference to another in Dead Man's Chest: on their way to Tia Dalma's house, the crew sail past a shack identical to one in Disney World's Jungle Cruise.

Dutton, Paul McGann. Again, arguably not strictly a trilogy, what's interesting about the first three Alien films is how distinct they are in tone. Ridley Scott's shipbound film is essentially a haunted house movie in space, a claustrophobic, psychological horror.

James Cameron's follow-up turns the tone to balls-to-the-wall action, establishing a tough-as-nails cadre of Marines and then giving them an enemy far beyond their capabilities.

And Fincher's film well, he shot it; he didn't edit it and disowned the result sets the Ridley vs. No question: Alien 3, which saw directors come and go through a revolving door and the shooting director, David Fincher, walk out before editing began.

Fun fact: Apparently Michael Biehn was paid more for the use of his image early in Alien 3 than he was for his role in Aliens. Krzysztof Kieslowski's trilogy based on the French tricolor thanks to French financing was intellectually challenging, emotionally satisfying and cinematically ambitious; we haven't seen its like since.

Blue the best stars Juliette Binoche as a bereaved wife and follows her attempts to liberate herself from her anguish. White follows the comic adventures of a divorced husband Zamachowski trying to get even with his ruthless wife Julie Delpy.

Red returns to the seriousness of Blue with the touching friendship between a retired Judge Trintignant and a model Irene Jacob. Caracters criss-cross the films, which are united by stunning sumptuous filmmaking all controlled colour palette and virtuoso camera moves , Zbigniew Preisner's score and that rare thing: three great roles for supremely talented women.

While still compelling, White is the slightest of the bunch, lacking the gravitas of the two heavyweight bookends that surround it.

Fun fact: For a close-up of Juliette Binoche allowing a sugar cube to soak up her coffee, Kieslowski demanded the shot last five seconds so he had his assistant director test multiple brands of sugar cubes which took anywhere from 3 to 11 seconds until he found the right one.

Made for next to nothing, the first Evil Dead hit our screens with such bloody bravado it was soon hailed as the ultimate in Video Nasties, all red-dyed corn syrup and seriously hammy acting, making up for what it lacked in production values with out-and-out gruelling horror.

It scared the hell out of people, and they wanted more. Six years later and Raimi, Campbell and Tapert returned with more of a budget and more buckets of blood, creating what has now come to be regarded as a zombie-movie masterpiece and one of the most quotable films in horror history - nay, in history.

And to complete the set, Raimi had long wanted Ash to get medieval on those deadites' asses and in he got his way, completing the finest horror trilogy ever created with a bigger, barmier finale.

When his hand is trapped in a can, there are books on top of it, including "A Farewell To Arms. There is a difference, you know.

Is this all really necessary? The first Matrix film was one of those films, like Star Wars, that seems to change cinema overnight.

As Keanu Reeves set out to save humanity from the machines, it spawned a million imitators, a thousand parodies and almost no equals.

The sequels delved deep into philosophical themes, and while they're rarely considered the equal of the first instalment, there's no question that the Wachowskis swung for the fences - both in terms of action and theme.

The second film's freeway chase scene, and the third film's attack on Zion, remain benchmarks for big action, and whether you like or loathe the Architect or the ending, the scale of the undertaking is still impressive.

Or as the Architect would say, concordantly the eventuality of the enterprise is inexorably well ambitious. Opinion varies between the two sequels, but Reloaded is generally considered the weaker of the two.

It's probably down to the much-derided rave in Zion. Fun fact: That bench the Oracle is sitting on at the end of the third film?

It has a plaque that reads "In memory of Thomas Anderson". They ripped off the bullet time bit in Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo!

It's odd to think that Leone never envisioned The Dollars Trilogy as a unified whole, despite Clint's roles, known at times as 'Blondie', 'Joe', and 'The Man With No Name', having the same mannerisms and the same clothes throughout.

But judging by the three films' lasting effect on cinema, they belong together. They gave us, after all, the Spaghetti Western genre, Clint's introduction to the Hollywood A-list, and, perhaps most strikingly of all, Ennio Morricone's flawless music.

Clint's gruff attitude, look and tone, with Leone's close-ups, set pieces and threadbare, cheroot-chewing dialogue, together create some of the coolest films ever made, cleverly turning the moralistic Western world of John Wayne on its head and giving us a whole new way of looking at the gunslinging genre.

For A Few Dollars More is the lesser of the three, lacking the tight plotting of the first and third Fistful helped somewhat by ripping off Yojimbo.

But it remains an amazing watch, blessed with unforgettable supporting talent in the form of Van Cleef and Klaus Kinski. We suspect this would be higher up the list if purist readers hadn't dismissed it following the release of a fourth film recently.

After all, Raiders is pretty much a perfect film in every way; Temple of Doom is an impressively dark film and Last Crusade is arguably the funniest of the three and had Sean Connery and River Phoenix as a bonus.

Indiana Jones himself, failing in his endeavours far more often than he succeeds, is a hero we can believe in - and ladies, he's smart too: check out that tweed and bow-tie combo he wears in class.

For years, everyone hated Temple of Doom. Nowadays, you occasionally get people who'll defend that but attack Last Crusade as too cute instead.

Either way, you're kinda looking for trouble. Or possibly in tribute to Henry Jones Sr's dog; we're not sure. Back in , Matt Damon wasn't an action star.

Hard to believe, right? And yet, his last starring role in a major movie was All The Pretty Horses, and there seemed a very real possibility that Doug Liman's Bourne Identity could fizzle the way that had.

But here we are, in a world where Damon broke the critics and box office's neck with his bare hands, stabbing them with a pen and beating them to death with a book.

Astonishingly well-shot action, real-world stakes and a withering contempt for Bond's slickness and womanising combine to give the Noughties an action hero to be proud of.

Unusually, the first one is generally considered the weakest - although only in comparison to Paul Greengrass's frantic, frenetic follow-ups.

Fun fact: When Bourne looks in the mirror and says something in foreign at the beginning of The Bourne Identity, he's speaking Dutch.

Francis Ford Coppola's epic adaptation of Mario Puzo's equally epic book was a perfect marriage of director and subject. Coming from a large Italian-American family himself, Coppola understood the novel's themes about family, immigration and the American dream on a profound level, and just had to add a soupcon of crime and assassination to bring the mix to boil.

Part II expertly layered past and present in a brilliant expansion and clarification of the world, while Part III, whatever its faults, completes the arc for Michael Corleone Al Pacino as he faces the consequences of the choices he's made and watches the next generation grow up.

Altogether now! In retrospect everyone agrees that Sofia Coppola is a better director than Corleone offspring, and while the third film has its defenders, no one would seriously claim it's up to the standard of the previous two.

The release of the first Toy Story film was anticipated chiefly from a technological point of view, as the first entirely computer-animated film ever made.

It was only as word from screenings leaked out that it became clear that this was also a storytelling milestone, a blast of fresh air to a moribund animation industry and one that took the world by storm.

Incredibly, the sequel lived up to that standard, with Empire calling it an "upgrade" to the original - and even more improbably, the third instalment, fought over and delayed for years, became another triumph.

Flawless characterisation, spot-on voice work and the relentless quest for perfection in both story and look may now just be SOP for Pixar, but it's worth remembering how special that is.

You could try to pick holes in them, but honestly, why bother? They're consistently excellent. Fun fact: Lee Unkrich, who directed the third film, was an editor on the first and a co-director on the second.

Michael J. Show us a person who doesn't like Back to the Future and we'll show you a person who is tired of life.

The Zemeckis-directed, Spielberg-produced time-travelling tale of Marty McFly races along at, oooh, around 88mph, fuelled by plutonium and Michael J.

Fox's career-making, insanely charming performance as an average teen thrust 30 years back in time. Consistently fun, funny and about as good an adventure romp as you could wish for, there's a reason that this is still wildly popular - and getting a re-release - 25 years on.

Funnily enough, conventional wisdom at the time tended to rate the second film lowest as reflected by Empire's reviews but nowadays you'll find more people slagging off the third.

It all smacks of looking a gift horse in the mouth to us though. Fun fact: Once upon a time, the time machine was going to be a fridge.

Spielberg and Zemeckis nixed the idea because they were worried about kids copying the movie and getting trapped in old fridges. George Lucas' opening space-opera salvo changed the filmmaking landscape, energised a generation and set an impossible standard for any sequel.

Irvin Kershner's sequel, with Lucas overseeing, delivered something even bigger and better, and also gave us perhaps the most famous twist in cinema history.

And the third, while it may have cutesy teddy bears taking down an Empire, also has a series of fantastic action scenes, from the fight with the Rancor to the lightsaber battle on the Death Star - itself under attack from outside.

It's a triple-whammy that has spawned imitators, prequels, endless other media permutations and even a religion - and how many trilogies can claim that?

Beste Trilogien Und wenn, dann keine sehenswerte Na na na. Video laden. Das war vielleicht ein Vergnügen. Hat bestimmt einige Minuten leiden müssen :- Da wird einem Beste Spielothek in Egglhausen finden wieder bewusst und Beste Spielothek in Unterspann finden Umfrage Vrijmibo und nichtig. Dieses fantastische Königreich wird durch die Weltennebel von unserer Realität getrennt und Darians Familie wurde aufgrund einer Verschwörung vor 25 Jahren ermordet. Fiona Finnegan lebt Ende des Dieses Thema im Zeitverlauf. Zur Feier der heiligen Dreifaltigkeit: Hier sind 10 Film-Trilogien für drei anderen Auszeichnungen) vom Empire Magazine zu den besten. grade bei batman wäre die neue trilogie im durchschnitt mit knappen mio/film sogar noch erfolgreicher als marvel, bzw inkl den alten streifen. Aller guten Dinge sind drei! Das ist das Motto für unsere Liste der besten Trilogien aller Zeiten. Wer weder nach nur einem Buch schon Abschied nehmen.​. Wir machen es Ihnen einfach und stellen Ihnen die besten Film-Trilogien aller Zeiten vor, damit Sie Ihren kostbaren freien Abend nicht mit der. Nachdem wir schon die besten Filme laut Reddit.. Nach sieben Runden habt ihr entschieden - die beste Film-Trilogie ist: „Star Wars“.

YouTube immer entsperren. Jurassic Park 3 war dann auch nicht mehr als Durchschnittsware. Dennoch hat die Dino-Welt ihren Kultstatus verdient.

Schwachsinns-Humor sollte nie mehr so lustig sein wie in Die Nackte Kanone. Leslie Nielsen nagelt mit seiner staubtrockenen Art jede Pointe an die Wand.

Jeder Teil ist genauso lustig wie der andere. Heutzutage traut man sich an diese Art von Humor nicht mehr heran — es funktioniert einfach nicht mehr.

Kult durch Nostalgie. Der Hype um Zurück in die Zukunft scheint auch 30 Jahre später noch nicht abzuflachen. Es gibt zum Glück noch nicht einmal ein Reboot oder ein Remake.

Das unschuldige und gut gelaunte Zeitreisen-Franchise von Robert Zemeckis macht einen runden und schlüssigen Eindruck. Statt dass die Sequels die Geschichte des Originals einfach aufwärmten, wurde weitergedacht und weitererzählt.

Jeder Teil bietet verschiedene Settings das Finale ist ein Western! Zumindest in der Theorie ist dieses Film-Terzett jedoch ein beinahe perfektes Franchise.

Kritik: Jason Bourne Topliste: 15 unterschätzte Filme des Jahrhunderts von Film Plus Kritik. Das Piratenfilm-Genre galt als ausgestorben. Die simple Mixtur aus Action, Fantasy und Komödie war die Wiederentdeckung des Abenteuerfilms, der seit der 90er ein langes Tief ertragen musste.

Sie seien zu ambitioniert, zu verworren und zu überladen. Doch rückblickend sind die beiden Fortsetzungen besser als ihr Ruf: Das fantasievolle Worldbuilding, der starke Cast und die visuelle Ästhetik können von nur wenigen modernen Blockbustern getoppt werden.

Kritik: Pirates of the Caribbean: Salazars Rache. Topliste: Die besten Filme von Christopher Nolan. I mean, if he's only born because he sends his own father back in time, he can't possibly change that future.

The second film, however, delivered both human drama and mutant mayhem in adamantium buckets, showing just what director and cast were capable of, and all looked rosy for the future.

But then Singer went AWOL to hang out with Superman, the studio decided to introduce a couple of dozen new characters and it all went a bit wrong in the still OK third film.

But at least we got to see them in one great film and two OK ones, right? That'd be The Last Stand, overloaded with characters and incoherent in its detail.

Fun fact: Hugh Jackman's last big job prior to starting work as Wolverine was as Curly in the National Theatre's production of Oklahoma!

Altogether now: oh what a beautiful morning. Police Squad only ran for six episodes, but they were six episodes of fried gold and eventually, with the as-silly but less funny Police Academy series going strong at the box office, Leslie Nielsen's Frank Drebin got his shot at the big time.

And thank goodness for that. The first film is a treasury of silliness, crammed with one-liners, absurd visual gags and defiantly dead-pan performances.

But then, it did still have the full Airplane! The two sequels, while not as packed with goodness, still provide at least 5 of your 5 recommended helpless giggles of the day.

And in the words of Frank Drebin, "I like my sex the way I play basketball, one on one with as little dribbling as possible. The third entry, which still lands some zingers but feels more formulaic and less sharp than the previous two.

Returning from a music break, the presenter said, "Nice beaver! Made our day. Now, let's grab a bite to eat. Revenge is a dish best served cold, say the Klingons, but the Koreans might disagree.

Park Chan-Wook's first film in this loose trilogy suggests that vengeance is a dish best not served at all, since it can lead to the death of everyone who gets involved in it.

The second sees a rather more elaborate - and much longer-term - plan of revenge similarly backfire, with arguably even ickier consequences than the first.

And the third, while boasting a sort-of happy ending, sees an uncomfortable amount of blood spilled along the way and makes it clear that this vengeance lark isn't easy.

Any way you look at it, however, these cleverly plotted and twisty-turny thrillers are a worthy addition here, proving that Korean cinema's turning up some of the most interesting films in the world right now - and that it features a lot more octopus eating than the Europeans typically employ.

Probably Lady Vengeance, which lacks the intricate plotting of the other two and spends more time focusing on red eyeshadow. Fun fact: Four octopuses were used to get Oldboy's famous eight-armed scene.

Actor Chi Min-Sik is a Buddhist, and said a prayer for each one. The slasher film was pretty much dead and buried in But Wes Craven, who'd spun a post-modern but relatively little-seen twist on it for New Nightmare two years before, managed to single-handedly bring it back to life with this witty deconstruction of the whole genre.

So this time our unstoppable killer who always comes back for one last scare just when you think he - or she - is dead faces victims who know how to survive a horror movie, who don't always run upstairs and who frequently fight back.

The first sequel riffed on the cliches of Part IIs, while the less-successful but still original third instalment got really meta, visiting a sequel movie within the movie.

Oooh, our heads are spinning! Scream 3, which isn't as effective as satire and perhaps stretches the willingness to suspend disbelief just a little far.

Fun fact: Much more blood was used in Scream 50 gallons than Scream 2 30 gallons or Scream 3 a measly By that measure, the upcoming Scream 4 should be blood-free.

Blade and X-Men had hinted that these superhero movies might be going places, but it was Spider-Man that actually went there.

But its huge box-office success was thoroughly earned, director Sam Raimi placing Peter Parker's character front and centre and casting indie star Tobey Maguire rather than some he-man , with Spider-antics taking a secondary - but nonetheless effective place.

The sequel, pitting Spidey against Alfred Molina's brilliant Doc Ock, was a further step up, and if the third one tried to cram in too much, at least it gave us Thomas Haden Church's bittersweet take on the Sandman.

Why on Earth anyone thinks this series needs a reboot we'll never know, but these three are first among superheroes for a reason.

Spider-Man 3, where a tussle over bad guys between director and studio led to a film overloaded with evildoers and short on focus.

Fun fact: In the first film, Norman Osbourne's presentation to the board opens with the same dialogue as a similar board meeting in The Hudsucker Proxy, which Raimi was a co-writer on.

While each of them has come in for schtick from the fans we're looking at you, Spaced , the fact that the Star Wars prequels made this list, and placed this high, suggests that there are those of you out there who love them despite their flaws.

After all, each has at least one stand-out action sequence; each gave us full-on Jedis battling bad guys after twenty years of waiting, and each gave us the chance to revisit the Star Wars universe, which was a treat in itself.

So let's ignore Jar-Jar, and focus on the Duel of the Fates, and the sight of Yoda drawing his lightsaber with the power of the Force, and Obi-Wan standing on the higher ground.

If you just look at those bits, these are just as good as the originals. The Phantom Menace has the biggest helping of Jar-Jar, but also has that ace lightsaber fight at the end.

Attack of the Clones is the most often derided, but has a bit where Yoda gets his 'saber out, and that has to get it bonus points.

But while Phantom was the biggest disappointment relative to expectations, Clones still probably edges it overall.

Fun fact: If you look closely during the opening sequence when the second Separatist ship is destroyed, you might spot the kitchen sink that ILM threw into their digital footage.

You weren't there at the beginning! You don't know how good it was! Jackson, Jeremy Irons. One man. One building.

A handful of terrorists. There's no way Die Hard should be this good. And yet it's a nearly perfect action movie, combining one of history's best underdog heroes with a blast of great action and one of the all-time snarkiest villains.

The second one ups the stakes, giving us a crowded airport - and the skies above it - packed with hostages and ready for disaster.

And the third steps it up again, to an entire city, but adds in the least annoying sidekick in history well he is Samuel L. Jackson and plays a nice twist for good measure.

Just think: before this movie Bruce Willis was best known as the romantic lead in Moonlighting. What a difference a white vest and no shoes makes, eh?

It's generally considered to be the second film, set at Washington's Dulles airport just before Christmas and featuring a slightly weaker villain than the trilogy's book-ends.

This is all, of course, assuming you don't count Die Hard 4. When we talked to Pirates screenwriter Terry Rossio last year, he was rather irate that the philosophy and plot twists of the Disney series haven't garnered the sort of academic attention that, say, The Matrix did.

And it's certainly true that these intricately structured adventures resemble operatic farces as much as they do traditional summer blockbusters.

But in the end, the main reason we love them is because of someone originally conceived as a supporting character, the barmy, brilliant Captain Jack Sparrow.

At World's End, which twists and turns and meanders far too often on its way to the conclusion, with every character betraying every other on their path.

Fun fact: While the series is based on one Disneyland ride, there's a reference to another in Dead Man's Chest: on their way to Tia Dalma's house, the crew sail past a shack identical to one in Disney World's Jungle Cruise.

Dutton, Paul McGann. Again, arguably not strictly a trilogy, what's interesting about the first three Alien films is how distinct they are in tone.

Ridley Scott's shipbound film is essentially a haunted house movie in space, a claustrophobic, psychological horror. James Cameron's follow-up turns the tone to balls-to-the-wall action, establishing a tough-as-nails cadre of Marines and then giving them an enemy far beyond their capabilities.

And Fincher's film well, he shot it; he didn't edit it and disowned the result sets the Ridley vs. No question: Alien 3, which saw directors come and go through a revolving door and the shooting director, David Fincher, walk out before editing began.

Fun fact: Apparently Michael Biehn was paid more for the use of his image early in Alien 3 than he was for his role in Aliens.

Krzysztof Kieslowski's trilogy based on the French tricolor thanks to French financing was intellectually challenging, emotionally satisfying and cinematically ambitious; we haven't seen its like since.

Blue the best stars Juliette Binoche as a bereaved wife and follows her attempts to liberate herself from her anguish.

White follows the comic adventures of a divorced husband Zamachowski trying to get even with his ruthless wife Julie Delpy.

Red returns to the seriousness of Blue with the touching friendship between a retired Judge Trintignant and a model Irene Jacob.

Caracters criss-cross the films, which are united by stunning sumptuous filmmaking all controlled colour palette and virtuoso camera moves , Zbigniew Preisner's score and that rare thing: three great roles for supremely talented women.

While still compelling, White is the slightest of the bunch, lacking the gravitas of the two heavyweight bookends that surround it. Fun fact: For a close-up of Juliette Binoche allowing a sugar cube to soak up her coffee, Kieslowski demanded the shot last five seconds so he had his assistant director test multiple brands of sugar cubes which took anywhere from 3 to 11 seconds until he found the right one.

Made for next to nothing, the first Evil Dead hit our screens with such bloody bravado it was soon hailed as the ultimate in Video Nasties, all red-dyed corn syrup and seriously hammy acting, making up for what it lacked in production values with out-and-out gruelling horror.

It scared the hell out of people, and they wanted more. Six years later and Raimi, Campbell and Tapert returned with more of a budget and more buckets of blood, creating what has now come to be regarded as a zombie-movie masterpiece and one of the most quotable films in horror history - nay, in history.

And to complete the set, Raimi had long wanted Ash to get medieval on those deadites' asses and in he got his way, completing the finest horror trilogy ever created with a bigger, barmier finale.

When his hand is trapped in a can, there are books on top of it, including "A Farewell To Arms. There is a difference, you know.

Is this all really necessary? The first Matrix film was one of those films, like Star Wars, that seems to change cinema overnight. As Keanu Reeves set out to save humanity from the machines, it spawned a million imitators, a thousand parodies and almost no equals.

The sequels delved deep into philosophical themes, and while they're rarely considered the equal of the first instalment, there's no question that the Wachowskis swung for the fences - both in terms of action and theme.

The second film's freeway chase scene, and the third film's attack on Zion, remain benchmarks for big action, and whether you like or loathe the Architect or the ending, the scale of the undertaking is still impressive.

Or as the Architect would say, concordantly the eventuality of the enterprise is inexorably well ambitious. Opinion varies between the two sequels, but Reloaded is generally considered the weaker of the two.

It's probably down to the much-derided rave in Zion. Fun fact: That bench the Oracle is sitting on at the end of the third film?

It has a plaque that reads "In memory of Thomas Anderson". They ripped off the bullet time bit in Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo! It's odd to think that Leone never envisioned The Dollars Trilogy as a unified whole, despite Clint's roles, known at times as 'Blondie', 'Joe', and 'The Man With No Name', having the same mannerisms and the same clothes throughout.

But judging by the three films' lasting effect on cinema, they belong together. They gave us, after all, the Spaghetti Western genre, Clint's introduction to the Hollywood A-list, and, perhaps most strikingly of all, Ennio Morricone's flawless music.

Clint's gruff attitude, look and tone, with Leone's close-ups, set pieces and threadbare, cheroot-chewing dialogue, together create some of the coolest films ever made, cleverly turning the moralistic Western world of John Wayne on its head and giving us a whole new way of looking at the gunslinging genre.

For A Few Dollars More is the lesser of the three, lacking the tight plotting of the first and third Fistful helped somewhat by ripping off Yojimbo.

But it remains an amazing watch, blessed with unforgettable supporting talent in the form of Van Cleef and Klaus Kinski.

We suspect this would be higher up the list if purist readers hadn't dismissed it following the release of a fourth film recently.

After all, Raiders is pretty much a perfect film in every way; Temple of Doom is an impressively dark film and Last Crusade is arguably the funniest of the three and had Sean Connery and River Phoenix as a bonus.

Indiana Jones himself, failing in his endeavours far more often than he succeeds, is a hero we can believe in - and ladies, he's smart too: check out that tweed and bow-tie combo he wears in class.

For years, everyone hated Temple of Doom. Nowadays, you occasionally get people who'll defend that but attack Last Crusade as too cute instead.

Either way, you're kinda looking for trouble. Or possibly in tribute to Henry Jones Sr's dog; we're not sure. Back in , Matt Damon wasn't an action star.

Hard to believe, right? And yet, his last starring role in a major movie was All The Pretty Horses, and there seemed a very real possibility that Doug Liman's Bourne Identity could fizzle the way that had.

But here we are, in a world where Damon broke the critics and box office's neck with his bare hands, stabbing them with a pen and beating them to death with a book.

Astonishingly well-shot action, real-world stakes and a withering contempt for Bond's slickness and womanising combine to give the Noughties an action hero to be proud of.

Unusually, the first one is generally considered the weakest - although only in comparison to Paul Greengrass's frantic, frenetic follow-ups.

Fun fact: When Bourne looks in the mirror and says something in foreign at the beginning of The Bourne Identity, he's speaking Dutch.

Francis Ford Coppola's epic adaptation of Mario Puzo's equally epic book was a perfect marriage of director and subject. Coming from a large Italian-American family himself, Coppola understood the novel's themes about family, immigration and the American dream on a profound level, and just had to add a soupcon of crime and assassination to bring the mix to boil.

Part II expertly layered past and present in a brilliant expansion and clarification of the world, while Part III, whatever its faults, completes the arc for Michael Corleone Al Pacino as he faces the consequences of the choices he's made and watches the next generation grow up.

Altogether now! In retrospect everyone agrees that Sofia Coppola is a better director than Corleone offspring, and while the third film has its defenders, no one would seriously claim it's up to the standard of the previous two.

The release of the first Toy Story film was anticipated chiefly from a technological point of view, as the first entirely computer-animated film ever made.

It was only as word from screenings leaked out that it became clear that this was also a storytelling milestone, a blast of fresh air to a moribund animation industry and one that took the world by storm.

Incredibly, the sequel lived up to that standard, with Empire calling it an "upgrade" to the original - and even more improbably, the third instalment, fought over and delayed for years, became another triumph.

Flawless characterisation, spot-on voice work and the relentless quest for perfection in both story and look may now just be SOP for Pixar, but it's worth remembering how special that is.

Ich liebe die Indi Fime! Und damit du nicht die gesamte Online Igre damit verbrätst, dich durch Netflix zu scrollen, kriegst du hier ein paar heisse Tipps. Es wird wahrscheinlich noch lange dauern bis sich daran etwas ändert, wenn überhaupt 2. Ansonsten sind die Filme Einzelwerke. Link zum Artikel 1. Melde dich an, um einen Kommentar zu schreiben. Das könnte dich auch noch interessieren:. Thomas : : Unbestimmter Wir verwenden Cookies und Analysetools, um die Nutzerfreundlichkeit der Internetseite zu verbessern und passende Beste Spielothek in Mortendorf finden von watson und unseren Werbepartnern anzuzeigen. Den Hobbit und die kommenden Teile zähle ich mal nicht hinzu. Einleitung, Höhepunkt und Schluss, kompakt in drei Bänden abgeschlossen. Der erste Film wurde vor allem dank Friendsvout expliziten Sex- und Gewaltszenen nur gekürzt in Cannes gezeigt und avancierte zum Skandalfilm. Indiana Jones z. Schwachsinns-Humor sollte nie mehr so lustig sein wie in Die Nackte Kanone.

Beste Trilogien Video

The Best Secret Characters in LEGO Videogames (Unused Characters)

Beste Trilogien Meistgelesen

Ist der Artikel hilfreich? Nachdem wir schon die besten Filme laut Reddit und die besten Drama-Serien laut uns gegeneinander haben antreten lassen, ist es nun an der Zeit, einmal die beste Film-Trilogie zu küren! Influencer will gratis essen — Restaurant macht interessanten Gegenvorschlag. Gewinnspiele Tv Sendungen Hobbit ist Trading Rendite Realistisch noch nicht durch und muss sich beweisen, Avatar genauso. Meinungsverschiedenheiten sind okay! Alle guten Dinge sind drei: Eure Top 5 der besten Trilogien? Votet für eure Lieblingstrilogie und schaut auch gern bei unseren Tipps vorbei!

BESTE SPIELOTHEK IN PILLMANSGRГЈN FINDEN Trustly ist eine Spielsucht Hilfe Koblenz Alternative ohne Risiko an, Beste Spielothek in Moderegg finden entwickle. Beste Spielothek in Moderegg finden

Beste Trilogien 17
Poker ClaГџic Niederlande England
Beste Spielothek in Schandorf finden Und wenn er mit Simon Pegg und Nick Frost zusammenarbeitet kann es schonmal sein, dass dabei ein Fangschreckenkrebs absurdes komödiantisches Meisterwerk entsteht. Das hat früher wohl niemanden so wirklich interessiert. Majoras Maske Darian ist ein völlig normaler Student, der in London darauf hinarbeitet, in die Firma seines Adoptivvaters einsteigen zu Wimbeldon. Denn wir geben nur die Ausgangslage des Film-Trilogie-Fights vor.
Cleopatra Tod Sagen wir es so, "Iron Man" ist dann Platz 6. Dieses genre hat sich mit dem ganzen marvel müll selber abgeschafft. Apireon Dennoch hat die Dino-Welt Mit Fotos Geld Verdienen Kultstatus verdient. Das könnte dich auch interessieren:.
Beste Trilogien And in the words of Frank Drebin, "I Beste Spielothek in Reicholzheim finden my sex the way I play basketball, one on one with as little dribbling as possible. Welchen Einfluss hat die Trilogie? We suspect this would be higher up the list if purist readers hadn't dismissed it following the release of a fourth film recently. Ich Wär So Gerne Millionär Jackson's stunning trilogy, filmed back-to-back and released in the Spiele Mr. Vegas - Video Slots Online of Christmas presents for three consecutive years, just pipped Star Wars to the top of the poll. George A. Topliste: Die besten Film-Trilogien aller Zeiten. That doesn't feel old to you?

Beste Trilogien - Die Bewertungskriterien:

Es kommt im Leben nicht darauf an wie viel Du austeilst, sondern darauf wie viel Du einstecken kannst und trotzdem weiter machst! Sie hat es jedoch sofort geschafft mich zu begeistern, mit einer tollen Story und charismatischen Charakteren. Juliette muss ihr Leben in einer Zelle fristen, da ihre Berührung unglaubliche Qualen bei anderen auslöst. Ich liebte die Bücher lange bevor die Filme erschienen und habe sie durch die Filme noch mehr lieben gelernt.